The Beguiled (2017)

THE-BEGUILED

The Beguiled is a 2017 American drama film written and directed by Sofia Coppola, based on the novel of the same name (originally published as A Painted Devil) by Thomas P. Cullinan. It stars Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning. A film of the same name, also based on Cullinan’s book, was released in 1971.

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Absolutely horrible! People do not waste your money! I was hoping for so much more, very disappointed. The only similarity to Misery is that it was miserable sitting through it. Characters were extremely weak with no substance. The performances were decent, but its hard to elaborate on such a bad film. Sophia hope you deliver on your next piece of work, this was atrocious.

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While out in the woods searching for mushrooms, Amy, one of the students, comes across John McBurney, a corporal in the Union Army who was wounded in the leg during battle and has since deserted the battlefield. Amy brings McBurney to the school where he falls unconscious. The women lock McBurney in one of the rooms while Miss Farnsworth tends to his wounds. All the women and girls in the school are immediately fascinated by the handsome man.

At the beginning, some residents want him to be delivered as a prisoner of war to the Confederate Army, but Miss Farnsworth decides that they will let his leg heal before they decide what they will do with him. When Confederate soldiers arrive at the school, Miss Farnsworth does not tell them that a Union soldier is on the premises.

foxgroveJul 20, 2017 Visually sumptuous and beautifully understated. Sofia Coppola has directed with assured confidence her best film to date, a remake of the 1971 version starring Clint Eastwood and Geraldine Page. The screenplay quietly bristles with sexual subtext and Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning are more than equal to the demands placed upon them by so intelligent a re-imagining, where subtlety is the order of the day. One is left compelled,grippedVisually sumptuous and beautifully understated. Sofia Coppola has directed with assured confidence her best film to date, a remake of the 1971 version starring Clint Eastwood and Geraldine Page. The screenplay quietly bristles with sexual subtext and Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst and Elle Fanning are more than equal to the demands placed upon them by so intelligent a re-imagining, where subtlety is the order of the day. One is left compelled,gripped and exhilarated. Definitely better than the original.… Expand 0 of 0 users found this helpful00

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The tension builds like a pressure cooker in Sofia Coppola’s The Beguiled. She wisely places the females at the center of the story, getting mileage out of the battle of the sexes that begins to form. But what is special about The Beguiled is its quiet, understated approach to the story. It unfolds like a slow-burning novel and spikes with intensity at given moments. And it’s all delivered with aplomb by the superb cast. Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, and Colin Farrell are tremendous. The actresses all navigate the tricky territory with subtlety. Farell reveals multiple layers in his performance, from charming to flirty to terrifying. He is perfect for the role. The film could have benefited from a bit more energy in its key scenes, but one walks away with the film firmly burned in the brain. Rating: 85

While the exterior shots were lovely, this movie was exceptionally dull and not very steamy. There were some amusing moments, but I was glad for it to end. And those exterior shots that were supposedly in Virginia? No. Clearly not Virginia, but southern Louisiana. The best part by far: cuddling with my guy.

When McBurney awakes the next day and realizes he has lost his leg, he is devastated and furious, accusing the women, and especially Miss Farnsworth, of having punished him for the chaos he brought to the school. He is locked up in his room but threatens Alicia to get him the room key. He then breaks out, steals a gun, threatens the women, and then storms off. Miss Morrow follows him to his room where they have passionate sex.

The women stand on the front steps of a dilapidated Southern plantation house, staring out at the muddy road beyond the gate, a road traversed back and forth by battered Confederate troops, heading towards or away from the fluctuating “front.” Outside the gates is all restless movement, inside the gates is stasis. Sofia Coppola’s “The Beguiled”—a remake (sort of) of the 1971 Don Siegel/Clint Eastwood film—is full of such tableaux. The “meaning” is not explicit in the images, although you could read plenty into it if you wanted to (the women are glimpsed between the iron bars of the gate, isolated from the world of men, etc). With its title-card gigantic in a swirling pink font, like a flourishing header in the diary of a melodramatic teenage girl, “The Beguiled” is a fairy tale, where beautiful spirited women and girls—flawed and filled with contradictory impulses—are locked away from the larger world (some by choice, others because they have nowhere else to go), and how a man disrupts their quiet; how much turbulence a man can bring. Gorgeously shot by Philippe Le Sourd (in his first collaboration with Coppola), “The Beguiled” lingers on its images, allows us time to settle into them.

Title:The Beguiled
Release:2017-06-23
Runtime:93 min.
Genre:Drama, Western
Stars:Colin Farrell, Nicole Kidman, Kirsten Dunst, Elle Fanning, Oona Laurence, Angourie Rice

 

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